Mack Draft: – John Stilson, Joe Pavone, Kirk Singer, Jack Armstrong, and Kyle Gaedele

John Stilson – Jr. – RHP – Texas A&M – After spending a season in junior college at Texarkana College, Stilson broke onto the Division One scene in a big way in 2010. Stilson started his Aggie career with 18 1/3 scoreless innings. In fact, he retired all 12 Seton Hall batters he faced in order in his first career appearance. He went on to go 9-1 with 10 saves and a ridiculous 0.80 ERA in 33 appearances out of the bullpen. He rang-up 114 strikeouts with a .181 opponent batting average in 79.0 innings. Stilson’s ERA set a new school record, while his 13.49 strikeouts per nine innings ranked second in the nation. Stilson closed the season strong as well. He didn’t allow an earned run after May 11-a span of 22 2/3 scoreless innings, which included 6 2/3 scoreless frames in the Coral Gables NCAA Regional. The All-American earned two saves and a win to help the Aggies win the Big 12 Tournament.- http://collegebaseball360.com/2011/02/14/top-11-college-baseball-relievers-to-watch-in-2011  

UConn starting catcher Joe Pavone will miss the entire 2011 season with a torn ACL he suffered last Friday sliding into a base. Last season, Pavone appeared in 39 games (36 starts) while hitting .273 with five homers and 20 RBI. Doug Elliot is expected to take over the starting catcher spot this season as he appeared in 31 games (28 starts) hitting .298 with two homers and 16 RB – http://www.collegebaseballdaily.com/2011/02/11/uconns-joe-pavone-out-for-the-season  

Kelby Tomlinson, Sam Lind, and Peter Mooney are all very much on the scouting radar despite not having a single major college at bat among them. Tomlinson and Mooney, he of the potential plus-plus glove, both look like starters from day one. Austin Nola, Brandon Loy, and Tyler Hanover all could have been back end of the top ten prospects in a different year. It wouldn’t be a college shortstop list without the requisite Long Beach State prospect. This year it’s Kirk Singer’s turn in the spotlight. He possesses many of the same talents of last year’s third rounder, Devin Lohman, right down to the strong arm, above-average hands, and questions about the bat. – . http://baseballdraftreport.com    

RHP Jack Armstrong Vanderbilt 6’7 220 – after a poor second season for the ‘dores, Jack Jr is showing plus fb velocity with some arm side run, he’s more effective down in the zone where he can get heavy action on his fb that produces grounders and k’s, velocity up to 94, most are 89-91 with sink when down, middle up fb is still very hittable, so command and consistency in his delivery are going to be key issues. This young man grew a lot from the time he turned 15 until last spring and he’s just starting to come into his own. Hard H3/4 cb that is up to 81, with downward action, late break which will improve and also shows effective straight change on occ. http://xmlbscout.angelfire.com  

Kyle Gaedele – Valparaiso – Gaedele plays for a small school in the Horizon League, but his 6’4, 220 pound frame is the build that scouts love. He batted .373 with seven home runs, eight triples, 19 doubles, 17 stolen bases, and 63 RBIs for the Crusaders in 2010. The Arlington Heights, IL native was drafted in the 32nd round by the Tampa Bay Rays out of high school, but he opted to play at Valpo for former Big Leaguer Tracy Woodson instead (Woodson was a member of the L.A. Dodgers‘ 1988 championship team). A junior, Gaedele looks to go higher in this year’s draft after the summer he had for the Madison Mallards in the Northwoods League. He broke four franchise records, including nine HR, and led the league in three offensive categories, including 56 runs scored. Baseball America ranked him as the #2 prospect in the league.- http://collegebaseball360.com/2011/02/07/top-college-baseball-outfielders-to-watch-in-20116

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