Cutnpaste: – Speed, Wayne Garrett, Craig Swan, Timo Perez, and Frenchy and Lasto

Speed:

The Mets are going to have a lot more stolen bases this year, than they did last year. I say that because of the return of superstar Carlos Beltran who will likely lead the team in stolen bases if healthy and barring a trade. Also, Jose Reyes, David Wright, and Jason Bay are all regulars who will put in similar stolen base numbers. Also, not forgetting Angel Pagan, who will get the starting job in all likelihood and will once again be a spark on the base paths for NY.
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/582857-mlb-power-rankings-rating-the-speed-of-all-30-major-league-teams#page/29  

Wayne Garrett:

Garrett broke into the majors in 1969 at the age of 21, platooning with Ed Charles as the Mets made their Miracle World Series run. While the team saw him as the third baseman of the future, the lefthanded hitting Garrett batted an unimpressive .218/.290/.268 in his rookie year, and the Mets decided he needed a righthanded hitting platoon buddy for the time being. So they went out and traded outfield prospect Amos Otis — who had just put up a .918 OPS as a center fielder at Triple-A — for Kansas City third baseman Joe Foy. Otis went on to record nearly 2000 hits and made five all star teams with the Royals; Foy played 99 games with the Mets in 1970, wandered off to the Senators, and was done in major league baseball after 1971. http://www.patrickfloodblog.com/2011/02/32-wayne-garrett-the-underrated-red.html

Craig Swan:

Craig Swan claims to be the first pitcher to come back from a torn rotator cuff; this may or may not be true. I believe he is the first pitcher to ever come back from a diagnosis of a torn rotator cuff, but I also believe it’s possible an Old Hoss type came back from a tear — probably diagnosed as a “dead arm” — without knowing that he did so. That said, when Swan injured his arm in 1980, pitchers simply did not come back from rotator cuff injuries. Rotator cuff surgery was an automatic end to a career, meaning rest and hope were the only options available, options that usually failed. Nevertheless, Swan made a successful return to the mound. His secret? Rolfing.
http://www.patrickfloodblog.com/2011/02/31-craig-swan-certified-rolfer.html  

Timo Perez:

Tigers signed OF Timo Perez to a minor league contract. Perez will be 36 years old in April and has not played in a major league game since 2007. He has hit well in the minors since then, but is not expected to make an impact in the majors this season with Detroit. http://www.rotoworld.com/content/home_MLB.aspx

Frenchy and Lasto:

And yet, they were exposed to very different markets. Francoeur was seen as quality platoon option by many and ended up getting $2.5 million from Kansas City. Milledge is younger and teams can control him cheaply beyond 2011, but you almost never heard anything about his ability to hit left-handed pitching. I don’t want to bring up race, but a part of me wonders if that factors into how each player is viewed within the industry.Frenchy is viewed as a gritty “gamer” while Milledge is generally considered to be immature and unfocused. Are those fair descriptions? Probably, on some level. But I think it’s a lot easier to believe those labels when Francoeur is white and Milledge isn’t. I’d like to think that we’re past the point of racial stereotypes in sports, but instances like this one leave me asking questions.
http://www.beyondtheboxscore.com/2011/2/3/1972862/milledge-in-pale-hose#storyjump  

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One Response to Cutnpaste: – Speed, Wayne Garrett, Craig Swan, Timo Perez, and Frenchy and Lasto

  1. CCY says:

    >> So they went out and traded outfield prospect Amos Otis — who had just put up a .918 OPS as a center fielder at Triple-A — for Kansas City third baseman Joe Foy. >>

    The trades of the early 70’s make the Omar maneuvers look like Peter Minuet purchasing Manhattan.

    An outfield of Jones, Otis & Singleton, a rotation of Seaver, Koos, Ryan, Matlack & McAndrews/Swan, a BP with McGraw & Apodaca…coulda, woulda, shoulda.

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